Guide Your Guide To Pregnancy: The Top 15 Tips And Tricks On How To Get Pregnant Fast

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Antenatal care with twins Pregnant with twins Healthy multiple pregnancy Getting ready for twins. Where to give birth: your options Antenatal classes Make and save your birth plan Pack your bag for birth. Due date calculator. Routine checks and tests Screening for Down's syndrome Checks for abnormalities week scan week scan Ultrasound scans If screening finds something. What is antenatal care Your antenatal appointments Who's who in the antenatal team. The flu jab Whooping cough Can I have vaccinations in pregnancy?

Healthy eating Foods to avoid Drinking alcohol while pregnant Exercise Vitamins and supplements Stop smoking Your baby's movements Sex in pregnancy Pharmacy and prescription medicines Reduce your risk of stillbirth Illegal drugs in pregnancy Your health at work Pregnancy infections Travel If you're a teenager.

Overweight and pregnant Mental health problems Diabetes in pregnancy Asthma and pregnancy Epilepsy and pregnancy Coronary heart disease and pregnancy Congenital heart disease and pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum Real story: hyperemesis gravidarum Hyperemesis gravidarum: husband's story Pre-eclampsia Gestational diabetes Obstetric cholestasis. Work out your due date Make and save your birth plan Maternity and paternity benefits Print your to-do list When pregnancy goes wrong.

The start of labour Signs of labour What happens when you arrive at hospital Premature labour Induction. What happens during labour and birth Forceps and ventouse delivery Pain relief Episiotomy What your birth partner can do Breech and transverse birth Caesarean Giving birth to twins What happens straight after the baby is born You after the birth Getting to know your newborn.

Feelings and relationships Dads and partners If you have a chronic condition When pregnancy goes wrong. Premature or ill babies Premature baby: mum's story Premature baby: dad's story.


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Make your birth plan. How to breastfeed Breastfeeding: the first few days Breastfeeding FAQs Breastfeeding positions and latch Benefits of breastfeeding Help and support Breastfeeding in public Expressing breast milk Breastfeeding a premature baby When to stop breastfeeding. Common breastfeeding problems Breastfeeding and thrush Breastfeeding and tongue tie Is my baby getting enough milk? Help for sore nipples Breast pain while breastfeeding. Breastfeeding and diet Breastfeeding and medicines Breastfeeding and smoking Breastfeeding and alcohol Going back to work.

Bottle feeding advice Sterilising bottles Combining breast and bottle Making up infant formula Types of infant formula Infant formula: common questions. Newborn blood spot test Newborn hearing test Newborn physical examination. What you'll need for your baby Washing and bathing your baby Getting your baby to sleep Soothing a crying baby How to change a nappy Nappy rash First aid kit for babies Baby car seats and car safety. Being a new parent Services for support for parents Rights and benefits for parents.

Your postnatal check Your post-pregnancy body Feeling depressed Sex and contraception Sleep and tiredness Coping with stress Keeping fit and healthy. Your newborn twins Multiple babies and sleep Feeding multiple babies Getting out and about Multiples and postnatal depression. Sign up for baby advice emails. Weaning and solid foods Your baby's first solid foods Babies: foods to avoid Food allergies in children Help your baby enjoy new foods What to feed young children Toddler food: common questions Fussy eaters Vegetarian and vegan children Vitamins for children Drinks and cups Food safety and hygiene Meal ideas for children.

What Docs Want You To Know: 25 Tips To Get Pregnant Faster

Teething symptoms Tips for helping a teething baby Looking after your baby's teeth. Spotting signs of serious illness Reflux in babies How to take a baby's temperature Reducing the risk of SIDS Treating a high temperature Sleep problems in children Coughs, colds and ear infections Diarrhoea and vomiting Infectious illnesses Children's medicines Looking after a sick child Serious conditions and special needs Constipation in young children Your baby's height and weight Baby health and development reviews Leg and foot problems in children.

How to potty train Bedwetting in young children Potty training problems Why play is important Play ideas and reading Keeping babies and toddlers active Helping your child's speech Teaching everyday essentials Difficult behaviour in children Temper tantrums Separation anxiety. Twins language development Twins at school.

First aid kit for your baby Baby and toddler safety Safety in the sun Baby accidents: what to do Resuscitation a baby Helping a choking baby Car seats and child car safety. Planning another pregnancy Children and new siblings Services and support for parents Rights and benefits for parents Lone parents.

Being a parent Help with childcare Sign up for weekly baby and toddler emails. Things you can try yourself to reduce high blood pressure Keeping active and doing some physical activity each day, such as walking or swimming, can help keep your blood pressure in the normal range. Pre-eclampsia Pre-eclampsia is a condition that affects some pregnant women, typically after 20 weeks. Labour and birth If you're taking medication throughout pregnancy to control your blood pressure, keep taking it during labour. After the birth, your blood pressure will be monitored. Younger teens' pregnancies, in particular, are considered high risk because their bodies haven't finished growing and are not yet fully mature.

Teen boys who are going to become fathers also need the involvement of their parents.

Although some boys may welcome the chance to be involved with their children, others feel frightened and guilty and may need to be encouraged to face their responsibilities the father is legally responsible for child support in every state. That doesn't mean, however, that you should pressure your teen son or daughter into an unwanted marriage.

Offer advice, but remember that forcing your opinions on your teen or using threats is likely to backfire in the long run. There's no "one size fits all" solution here. Open communication between you and your teen will help as you consider the future. Even though most teen girls are biologically able to produce healthy babies, whether they do often depends on whether they receive adequate medical care — especially in those critical early months of pregnancy.

Teens who receive proper medical care and take care of themselves are more likely to have healthy babies. Those who don't receive medical care are at greater risk for:. The earlier your teen gets prenatal care, the better her chances for a healthy pregnancy , so bring her to the doctor as soon as possible after finding out she's pregnant. If you need help finding medical care, check with social service groups in the community or at your child's school.

Your teen's health care provider can tell her what to expect during her pregnancy, how to take care of herself and her growing baby, and how to prepare for life as a parent. At her first prenatal visit, your teen will probably be given a full physical exam, including blood and urine tests. She'll be screened for sexually transmitted diseases STDs and for exposure to certain diseases, such as measles, mumps, and rubella. Knowing what to expect can help alleviate some of the fears your daughter may have about being pregnant.

Her health care provider will probably prescribe a daily prenatal vitamin to make sure she gets enough folic acid, iron, and calcium. Folic acid is especially important during the early weeks of pregnancy, when it plays a role in the healthy development of the neural tube the structure that develops into the brain and spinal cord.

Your teen's health care provider will talk about the lifestyle changes she'll have to make for the health of her baby, including:. If your daughter smokes or uses alcohol or other drugs, her health care provider can offer ways to help her quit. Fast food, soft drinks, sweets — teen diets are notoriously unbalanced. Eating well greatly increases your teen's chances of having a healthy baby, so encourage her to maintain a well-balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain breads use the U.

Department of Agriculture's MyPlate as a guide.

Pregnancy fit tips - Turning in bed

Pregnancy is not the time for your daughter to go on a diet. When pregnant, some teens might be tempted to counter normal pregnancy weight gain by cutting calories or exercising excessively — both of which can seriously harm their babies. If you suspect that your teen has an unhealthy preoccupation with her weight, talk to her health care provider. If your teen was physically fit before getting pregnant and is not experiencing any pregnancy complications, her health care provider will probably encourage her to continue exercising.

Most women benefit from getting some exercise during pregnancy, although they might have to modify their activity. Low-impact exercises, such as walking and swimming, are best. Have your daughter discuss her exercise plans with her health care provider early on. Most teens enter parenthood unprepared for the stress a new baby brings, and many experience frustration, resentment, and even anger toward their newborns — which may explain why teen parents are at higher risk for abusing and neglecting their babies.

You may want to talk with your teen's doctor to discuss ways you can help her manage her stress levels so that she can better cope with changes in her life. She also may want to spend some time with other parents of newborns to get a better sense of what caring for a baby involves.

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Your daughter's health care provider will probably recommend that she take classes on pregnancy, giving birth, and parenting. These classes some of which are held just for teens can help prepare her for the practical side of parenthood by teaching skills such as feeding, diapering, child safety, and other basic baby care techniques. Many practical issues must be considered. Will your teen keep the baby or consider adoption?

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If she keeps it, will she raise the baby herself? Will she continue to go to school? Will the father be involved in the baby's life? Who will be financially responsible for the baby?